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This message is dated Wednesday 5th August 2020 - Ascot

Alert message sent 05/08/2020 12:44:00

Information sent on behalf of Thames Valley Police


This message is dated Wednesday 5th August 2020 for Ascot.
 
ANOTHER REALLY GOOD 48 HOURS.
 
NO BURGLARIES
 
AND
 
NO CARS BROKEN INTO

 
SCAMS & FRAUDS IN RBWM OVER THE LAST WEEK
 
FIRST:  We have reports of new letters arriving from China - someone with a name similar to yours has died leaving a large amount of money and you may be entitled to a large inheritance.  The letter goes on to request the recipient emails the letter sender with their full details including bank details for a transfer of the money - If you get one these - BIN IT !
 
NEXT:  The old - ‘I am crying as I write this message as I have been robbed and have no money to pay for my hotel or to get home’; ………is back as people start to travel.  In one case, a friend received a ‘Snapchat’ message from someone they knew well - saying the above, so they sent them £80.  They then got another message to say - could they have an additional £200 !  They became suspicious and made some enquiries.  Their friend’s computer had been hacked and this message had been sent to everyone, in their personal address book !  If you get one of these - BIN IT
 
NEXT:  Phone calls - the old Windows / Microsoft / BT scam - Your computer is running slowly / been hacked and have malware in the computer.  In one case they called twice due to connection problems once a man and on the second occasion a woman.  ANYTHING LIKE THIS - JUST PUT THE PHONE DOWN.
 
NEXT:  Several cases of 'Boiler Room' / Investment Frauds reported to us, involving large sums of money !
 
Share sale, boiler room, hedge fund or bond fraud - involves bogus stockbrokers, usually based overseas, cold calling people to pressure them into buying shares that promise high returns. In reality, the shares are either worthless or non-existent.
  • You are usually contacted out of the blue by a professional-sounding stockbroker, who offers you investment opportunities that seem too good to be true. You are also promised free research reports, special discounts and ‘secret’ stock tips.
  • In reality, the fraudsters are cold calling as many people as possible, persuading them to invest in shares that are either non-existent, or so worthless they are impossible to sell.
  • The fraudsters may provide false share certificates and other documents, to make the investments seem credible.
  • Once the fraudsters have squeezed whatever money they can from investors, they quickly disappear.
  • Share sale frauds tend to start with a telephone call out of the blue. Using hard-sell techniques, the fraudsters try to pressure you into making rushed decisions, giving you no time to consider the nature of the investment.

As with many fraudulent schemes, you’re encouraged to keep your investment secret, to ensure you receive maximum returns. This allows the fraudsters to hide, the real nature of their scheme.
Fraudsters aim to make their business seem legitimate, so they will often use technical jargon, impressive job titles and mock websites, to appear credible.
Are you a victim of share sale fraud?
  • You are usually contacted out of the blue by a professional-sounding stockbroker who offers you investment opportunities that seem too good to be true. You are also promised free research reports, special discounts and ‘secret’ stock tips.
  • In reality, the fraudsters are cold calling as many people as possible, persuading them to invest in shares that are either non-existent, or so worthless they are impossible to sell.
  • The fraudsters may provide false share certificates and other documents to make the investments seem credible. Once the fraudsters have squeezed whatever money they can from investors, they quickly disappear.
  • Share sale frauds tend to start with a telephone call out of the blue. Using hard-sell techniques, the fraudsters try to pressure you into making rushed decisions, giving you no time to consider the nature of the investment
  • As with many fraudulent schemes, you’re encouraged to keep your investment secret to ensure you receive maximum returns. This allows the fraudsters to hide the real nature of their scheme.
  • Fraudsters aim to make their business seem legitimate, so they will often use technical jargon, impressive job titles and mock websites to appear credible.

Are you a victim of share sale fraud?
You’ve bought shares from somebody you don’t know over the telephone.

To transact the deal, you’ve given them your bank account details.
What should you do if you’re a victim of share sale fraud?

Report it to Action Fraud.
  • Break off all contact with the fraudster at once.
  • Alert your bank immediately, if you’ve given the fraudsters your bank account details.
  • Keep any written communications you’ve received from the share sale fraudsters. This may help you give evidence to the authorities.

Because many boiler rooms are run from abroad, they’re not covered by UK jurisdiction or compensation schemes. Therefore, you’re unlikely to recover any lost investment.

Be aware that you are now likely to be a target for other frauds. Fraudsters often share details about people they have successfully targeted or approached, using different identities to commit further frauds.

People who’ve already fallen victim to fraudsters are particularly vulnerable to the ‘fraud recovery’ scam. This is when fraudsters contact people who’ve already lost money through fraud and claim to be law enforcement officers or lawyers. They advise the victim that they can help them recover their lost money – but request a fee.  In one case, scammers purporting to be Met Pol police officers, obtained over £50,000 to investigate and try and recover, lost funds.

Protect yourself against share sale fraud

If you’re considering any type of investment, always remember: if it seems too good to be true, then it probably is. High returns can only be achieved with high risk.

If you’re suspicious about a scheme’s authenticity, you should investigate the company’s status and contact details.

The Financial Services Authority regulates stockbrokers based in the UK. You can check a stockbroker’s authenticity by visiting the FSA’s:
  • Register of authorised firms - available on the website via link
  • List of unauthorised firms and individuals:- available on the website via link
  • List of unauthorised overseas firms - available on the website via link

Alternatively, call the FSA’s consumer helpline on 0300 500 5000

You’ve bought shares from somebody you don’t know over the telephone.

To transact the deal, you’ve given them your bank account details.
What should you do if you’re a victim of share sale fraud?

Report it to Action Fraud.

More information about the following Scams & Frauds are on the Action Fraud Website:
https://www.actionfraud.police.uk/a-z-of-fraud-category/financial-investment
  •  
  • Boiler room fraud
  • Bond fraud
  • Call centre fraud
  • Cryptocurrency investment fraud
  • Goods sold as investment
  • Hedge fund fraud
  • Holiday club fraud
  • Identity fraud and identity theft
  • Institutional investment fraud
  • Investment fraud
  • Market manipulation
  • Marketing materials
  • Pensions scams
  • Ponzi schemes
  • Prime bank guarantee fraud
  • Property fraud
  • Pyramid scheme fraud
  • Share sale and investment fraud
  • Spam emails
  • Timeshare fraud
  • Work from home scams

In one case reported to us, the scammer promised 5.7% interest and over £52,000 was handed over.
 
Would you hand over very large sums of money, to a complete stranger in a coffee shop, who leans over and asks if you have a money to invest, as he is a broker with a brilliant high interest return, investment scheme - of course not.  If not - why would you hand over money, to a complete stranger on the phone !
 
DON’T DO IT - DON’T LET IT BE YOU
 
CRIME:
 
I have attached reference numbers to each crime report. If you live in the vicinity of any of the crimes mentioned and have CCTV or a video doorbell, can you please check the footage. If you have any that might be of interest to the police, can you please make contact with us, quoting reference number given.
 
I have added a new email address below.  The first email address is directly to your local Neighbourhood Team.  The second is to our investigation team.  Please use it to send any intelligence / video doorbell / CCTV footage you may have, which is relevant to any of the crimes lists below - quoting the reference number.
 
Alternatively you can call 101 or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or email - www.crimestoppers-uk.org
 
ASCOT:
ascotgeographical@thamesvalley.pnn.police.uk
SR.windsor&maidenhead@thamesvalley.pnn.police.uk
SUNNINGDALE:
3/8  Monday 5 p.m.  Sunning Avenue.  Youths entered the property and set fire to a chair leaving a mess.  They returned later and were disturbed, damaging a wall as they made off.  Ref. No:  43200239318
 
SUNNINGHILL:
NO CRIME TO REPORT.
 
ASCOT & SOUTH ASCOT:
NO CRIME TO REPORT.
 
NORTH ASCOT:
NO CRIME TO REPORT.

 
 
Please consider using our online reporting system but please note this reporting tool is not for use where a crime happening right now, the suspect is still at the scene, or anyone seriously injured or in immediate danger.
 
https://www.thamesvalley.police.uk/
 
follow us on Facebook:
 
https://www.facebook.com/TVPWindsorandMaidenhead
 
Eyes, ears.....and Brain
 
Jeff
Jeffrey.pick@thamesvalley.pnn.police.uk

 
NEWS UPDATE FROM NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH

The lockdown has resulted in many neighbourhoods drawing closer together in supporting local residents with needs, and in neighbours spending a lot more time talking to each other over fences or across the road. This has improved community spirit to no end, and a great way to keep this spirit alive is for residents to join their local Neighbourhood Watch scheme, or start up a new scheme if there is not already one covering their respective street.

Neighbourhood Watch is not just about looking out the window and being alert for any crime in the neighbourhood, it is much more than that. It serves as a valuable resource for crime prevention, in supporting the Police with things such as local home security surveys, installing crime prevention aids in homes for the vulnerable and elderly especially, helping those vulnerable and elderly residents with any other needs, and in drawing residents together in supporting one another.
 
The Windsor & Ascot NHW Association is making great strides in reactivating and expanding Neighbourhood Watch within the various parishes of Windsor & Ascot. Its Facebook page (@WindsorAscotNHW) is receiving multiple enquiries from interested residents and serves as a means to highlight local issues relating to crime and residents in need. New NHW schemes are continuously being set up with active Coordinators, and residents within those scheme areas can now benefit from the new initiatives being introduced by Neighbourhood Watch and Thames Valley Police.
 
To search for your nearest NHW scheme, or to set up a new scheme, visit www.ourwatch.org.uk and enter your postcode. 

For any questions relating to Neighbourhood Watch please contact the Windsor & Ascot NHW Association at contact@windsorascotnhwa.org.uk

 
Message sent by
Jeffrey Pick (Police, Community Engagement & Resilience Officer, Windsor & Maidenhead LPA)

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